Gaming Clubs: Making Casual Gaming Social

Posted by Conor Murphy on July 28, 2011 in Editorial -- Share:

Kindle Gaming When was the last time you were playing a game and you got stuck? Have you ever wanted to ask a friend where the hidden object is in level 4? Or how to unlock the secret passage through the kitchen?

Turning solitary activities, such as gaming, into social events has been happening for years. Book clubs allow people with similar interests to gather and discuss what they have read (and let’s be honest, gossip). Knitting circles allow woman to swap more than just needles and thread on a regular basis. People are by nature social creatures, so it only makes sense we gather and share our thoughts with one another. Running, cooking, scrapbooking, you name it; every casual interest has some way of becoming a face-to-face activity.

So why not gaming clubs? Games are a regular part of many people’s lives. They fill the same needs as books by providing an escape from the everyday routine. Whether it’s playing a quick game of Bejeweled on the bus to work, or sitting down and becoming immersed in the world of Drawn, games are more than a way to pass the time; they are a way to unwind and can easily be a social activity.

In our newest release, Hidden Expedition: Amazon on the Kindle, jump right into the adventure by embarking on a quest for the missing professor in a maze of temple ruins, overgrown jungle, and lost secrets. Then, keep the fun going. Get together with a group of your closest friends and discuss your favorite parts, characters, and puzzles. Or, if you are already in a book club, suggest playing the game next month on the Kindle in combination with reading a related book for an even more in-depth experience.

Every month select a new game to play in unison. Suggest combining the fun of both reading and gaming by selecting a game title from one of our Nancy Drew or Sherlock Holmes inspired games. Become the leading character and solve the mystery yourself. Then talk strategy and tips with your friends and compare the book to the game.

We live social lives; shouldn’t we enjoy gaming in social situations as well?

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Conor is a Marketing Manager with Big Fish, working out of the Seattle office. In his spare time he enjoys watching science documentaries and playing old school adventure games. Get in touch with him on Twitter! or Google+